Daily Life & Holidays

To schedule a program or for more information, please email the Programs Coordinator or call (804) 649-1861 x121.

To Take Tea
Explore the art of teatime during the Victorian era at this special program. Topics covered will include visiting cards, visiting etiquette, the history of tea and typical foods consumed during teatime. An assortment of teas and light refreshments will be available.
Length:  1.5 hrs.
Cost:  $12 per person for on-site programs and $15 per person for off-site.
Conditions:  To Take Tea has a 10 person minimum and a 25 person maximum.

Captivating Details: Selected Quilts from the Museum’s Collection
Overview:  The Museum is a repository for approximately 30 Southern quilts and blocks that span the 19th century. Each one provides a fascinating insight into the lives of the citizens who made and used them. Learn about quilt construction, period fabrics, and the unique stories behind many of the Museum’s quilts using new information easily observed in high-resolution digital photography.
Length:  1 hr.

Victorian Christmas Traditions
How did families celebrate the holiday season in the mid-19th century? Come discover decorating techniques, dinner menus, regional customs, and other ways that Americans commemorated Christmas during the Victorian era. A virtual tour of the White House of the Confederacy, decorated for the holidays, is included.
Length: 1 hr.

Hearts at War
This presentation will focus on the history of Valentine's Day, the start of Valentine's Day traditions in America and how the War affected those traditions in the South.  The Power Point presentation will include original valentines in the Museum of the Confederacy's collections and excerpts from letters between soldiers and their loved ones.
Length:  1 hr.

Death and Mourning in the 19th Century
Through PowerPoint this talk will focus on the common societal views of death, mourning, religion and superstition in the 19th century, especially as they pertained to the Davis and Lincoln families. It will discuss religious, secular and popular customs and superstitions used to remember and honor loved ones after death.
Length: 1.25 hrs.

Civil War Richmond
Through this PowerPoint presentation, learn why Richmond was chosen as the Confederate capital and how the city changed as a result, becoming a place of hospitals and military prisons besieged by dangers from within and without.
Length: 1.25 hrs.

The War Comes Home: The Civilian Experience During the Seven Days Battles
Most people are familiar with the Seven Days Battles that took place around Richmond the summer of 1862. Few realize the enormous impact these battles had on civilians living near the battlefields. Learn about Judith McGuire, the burial of Captain Latane, Fannie Gaines Tinsley, the battle of Gaines’ Mill, and other stories about the civilian experience when the war came to the homefront.
Length: 1.5 hrs.

The Struggle for Survival: Richmond 1863
Through PowerPoint, participants will “tour” 1863 Richmond and learn about events such as the Confederate States Laboratory explosion on Brown’s Island, Richmond Bread Riots, and Stonewall Jackson’s death. Participants will learn these and many more stories of death, riots, and inflation in the capital of the Confederacy and why 1863 was a true struggle for survival.
Length: 1.5 hrs.

The Struggle for Survival: Richmond 1863 (Walking Tour)
Step back in time on this walking tour of downtown Richmond and discover a city immersed in a desperate battle for survival. Attendees will learn about events such as the Confederate States Laboratory explosion on Brown’s Island, Richmond Bread Riots, and Stonewall Jackson’s death. Participants will learn these and many more stories of death, riots, and inflation in the capital of the Confederacy and why 1863 was a true struggle for survival.
Length: 2 hrs.