April 11, 2015 - 9:00am
Appomattox

Enjoy coffee and muffins at the Museum as Bud Robertson presents “From Battlefield to Peace: The Ultimate Campaign.” The commemoration of the Appomattox surrender's 150th anniversary continues throughout the day. Tickets are $5.00 for members and $15.00 for non-members. Reserve your seat here!

April 11, 2015 - 11:00am
Appomattox

General Robert E. Lee (David Palmer) will deliver a monologue on the events of April 1, 1865. Event will be held in the Robertson Room at the Museum of the Confederacy-Appomattox. 

April 11, 2015 - 1:00pm
Appomattox

The Appomattox Youth Chorale will perform at the Museum. Cost: Included with museum admission. 

April 12, 2015 - 9:00am
Appomattox

Enjoy coffee and muffins at the Museum as Ed Ayers lectures about “The Valley of the Shadow: Views From the North and South.”​ The commemoration of the Appomattox surrender's 150th anniversary continues throughout the day. Tickets are $5.00 for members and $15.00 for non-members. Reserve your seat here!

April 17, 2015 - 12:00pm
Richmond

Richmond’s abrupt transition from Confederate capital to Union occupation in April 1865 meant tremendous changes for its civilian population. Basic necessities, such as food and shelter, could be difficult to come by, particularly with much of the city literally in ashes. Along with these challenges came opportunities for the city’s civilians, but perhaps especially for newly-emancipated African Americans. Join Curator Cathy Wright for this talk. 

April 21, 2015 - 12:00pm
Richmond

Michael Schein will discuss his book, John Surratt: The Lincoln Assassin Who Got Away in which he examine the evidence of whether John Surratt- a fierce secessionist and Booth’s closest associate in the four months leading up to the assassination- had an airtight alibi, or whether he cheated fate and the gallows through a combination of cunning and luck (thereby avoiding the fate of his mother Mary Surratt, who was hanged for her role in the plot).

April 23, 2015 - 6:30pm
Appomattox

Description: Generals Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant met twice at Appomattox Court House. The surrender at the McLean House on the afternoon of April 9, 1865 saw the drawing up and signing of the surrender terms themselves. The following morning, April 10, these two men met again, briefly, to discuss the fate of the other Confederate armies throughout the South. With Lee and Grant's inability to end the war completely, the question turned to the fate of Lee's own soldiers, now paroled and allowed to return home. How would they travel safely through a war zone?

May 15, 2015 - 12:00pm
Richmond

Most people believe that the Civil War ended with Lee’s surrender to Grant at Appomattox, but the men who were surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina; Meridian, Mississippi; Mobile, Alabama, and at other places; those who died at the battle of Palmetto Ranch, Texas, in May 1865; and Confederate soldiers still in Northern prison camps would beg to differ. And even if the armies had surrendered, was the Confederacy defeated if President Jefferson Davis and his cabinet were still at large?

May 30, 2015 - 2:00pm
Richmond

Professor Michael Ross will discuss his latest work, The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case: Race, Law and Justice in the Reconstruction Era. In this book, Ross offers the first full account of the kidnapping of seventeen-month-old Mollie Digby by two African American women. This event electrified the South at one of the most critical moments in the history of American race relations.

June 19, 2015 - 12:00pm
Richmond

On June 23, 1865, Cherokee leader Stand Watie became the last Confederate general to surrender his troops. Join Interpretation and Programs Specialist, Sean Kane as he explores the contributions and experiences of American Indians during the Civil War.

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