Col. Robert Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts by Mort Kunstler

The 54th Massachusetts Infantry was the first volunteer black regiment raised in the North. The ranks were filled with former slaves and freedmen, all sharing the same dream of serving their country. Under the tutelage of its firebrand colonel, Robert Gould Shaw, the 54th became a model of perfection in drill and camp. Their true test came in battle, a suicidal assault on Battery Wagner on the South Carolina coast. Killed on the ramparts of the fort, Shaw was buried in an unmarked grave with the casualties of his regiment.

$39.00
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Cinnamon Pear Preserves

Millcroft Farms Cinnamon Pear Preserves are made from only the freshest pears and the specks of cinnamon can be seen in this delicious jam. Perfect to use in baking, or heated and poured over ice cream. Made in VA. 10 oz.

$5.65
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Courage In Blue by Mort Kunstler

Lieutenant Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. At Fredericksburg, Chamberlain and the 20th Maine experienced sacrifice and defeat. The men from Maine pushed their way over the bodies of their fallen comrades to within a stone’s throw from the Southern line before they were forced to find cover on the littered slopes below Marye’s Heights. There they stayed in the bitter cold all night and all day, lying amid the bodies of the dead. Finally, on the afternoon of the next day, they were recalled for the retreat of the Federal army. It was a harrowing and heart-rending exposure to the worst of war for Chamberlain and his men. Yet, they had proven their mettle. The valor they and other troops from the Army of the Potomac displayed at Fredericksburg would become one of the war’s most memorable and heroic sagas.

$39.00
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Honey

Stratford Hall honey is raw, all natural and never heated. The beehives are on the property of Stratford Hall, the boyhood home of Robert E. Lee. 10 oz.

$10.95
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Gettysburg Address by Mort Kunstler

When Lincoln was invited to make his speech, Americans were still trying to recover from the shock of 51,000 casualties incurred at the battle of Gettysburg a few months earlier. Lincoln did not scribble the speech on the back of an envelope as later mythologized, but had instead written it a week or two earlier on White House stationery, and then polished it at Gettysburg the night before the event.

At 10 a.m. on Thursday, November 19, 1863, 15,000 people listened as Edward Everett delivered a rousing two-hour patriotic speech. In contrast, when Lincoln arose, attired in a new black suit, he delivered a surprisingly brief speech. It consisted of 272 words and required no more than two minutes to deliver. He was interrupted by applause only twice, but his audience knew when he finished that they had witnessed an epic event.

$39.00
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Hot pepper jelly

Millcroft Farms hot pepper jelly is made from three kinds of peppers, including habaneros and jalapenos. This fiery spread is great with crackers and cream cheese, or for a holiday gift! Made in VA.10 oz.

$5.65
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Soldiers of Old Glory by Mort Kunstler

This print depicts Gen. Winfield S. Hancock and and his staff. The term "fighting general" would aptly apply to Hancock. "He is magnificent in appearance, lordly, but cordial," a member of his staff wrote. Hancock differed "from other officers I have served with in being always in sight during action."

$39.00
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Jalapeno Relish

MeadowCroft Farm's Jalapeno Pepper Relish has just enough bite to complete any sandwich or dip. No preservatives added. Made in Swoope, VA. 12 oz.

$7.95
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Iron Maker to The Confederacy

Charles Dew's unsurpassed Ironmaker to the Confederacy tells the story of the South's premier ironworks and its intrepid owner, Joseph Reid Anderson. Dew masterfully describes Tredegar's struggle to supply the Confederate nation with the weapons of war and is a seminal study of southern manufacturing and industrial slavery. This revised edition includes a new preface by the author, additional illustrations, and redesigned maps of the ironworks based on new site research and archeology.

$25.00
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Creamer Pitcher - Green

This piece is an example of a commonly used household item. It is not a reproduction of an artifact. Each piece was hand-blown in Virginia and is one of a kind. No two pieces are identical. This piece measures approximately 3 ¾ high.
The natural color of glass is green, because sand has iron oxide or rust in it naturally. To change the color, a metal must be added.

$26.00
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