Women and African Americans

To schedule a program or for more information, please email the Programs Coordinator or call (855) 649-1861, ex. 121.

Nightingales of the South:  Two Nurses in Civil War Richmond
This talk highlights the wartime work of Phoebe Yates Pember and Sally Tompkins, two women who broke boundaries by entering what had been primarily a man’s domain.  Working as hospital matron’s, they insured that Confederate soldiers received the highest standard of care possible while they stove with those who sought to limit their authority.
Length: 1 hr.

First Ladies of the Civil War
Through the use of PowerPoint, this program will explore the lives of Varina Davis and Mary Todd Lincoln, examining them not only as First Ladies but also as wives, mothers, and widows.  Discover the triumphs and tragedies of these two remarkable women.
Length:  1.25 hrs.

Southern Women in the Civil War
Every woman living in the South during the years 1861-1865 was profoundly affected by the American Civil War. Their responses to challenges and opportunities were shaped, in large part, by race and class. Discover how southern women shaped and were shaped by this dramatic event.
Length: 1 hr.

Captivating Details: Selected Quilts from the Museum’s Collection
The Museum is a repository for approximately 30 Southern quilts and blocks that span the 19th century. Each one provides a fascinating insight into the lives of the citizens who made and used them. Learn about quilt construction, period fabrics, and the unique stories behind many of the Museum’s quilts using new information easily observed in high-resolution digital photography.
Length: 1 hr.

From Belles To Battleaxes:  Women of Civil War Richmond
Through this PowerPoint presentation discover the women of Civil War Richmond, from daring spies and devoted nurses to star-crossed lovers and captivating socialites.  Learn about Rose O’Neal Greenhow, Elizabeth Van Lew, Mary Chesnut, Hetty Cary, Buck Preston and more.
Length:  1.25 hrs.

From Belles To Battleaxes:  Women of Civil War Richmond (Walking Tour)
Stroll through the heart of the Confederate capital and hear the stories of Richmond women, from daring spies and devoted nurses to star-crossed lovers and captivating socialites.  Learn about Rose O’Neal Greenhow, Elizabeth Van Lew, Mary Chesnut, Hetty Cary, Buck Preston and more.
Length:  2 hrs.

Voices of Abolition
Through the use of PowerPoint, this program explores the contributions of African Americans to the abolition movement.  Among those highlighted are Frederick Douglas, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman.

Liberty & Loyalty: Portraits of the Confederate White House Staff
The White House of the Confederacy’s household staff was a diverse group of enslaved African Americans, free blacks, Irish immigrants, and a German florist.  Using information obtained from letters, memoirs and newspaper articles, this PowerPoint presentation will bring the lives of the Davis servants, including the mysterious Mary Bowser, into focus. 
Length:  1 hr.

The War Comes Home: The Civilian Experience During the Seven Days Battles
Most people are familiar with the Seven Days Battles that took place around Richmond the summer of 1862. Few realize the enormous impact these battles had on civilians living near the battlefields. Learn about Judith McGuire, the burial of Captain Latane, Fannie Gaines Tinsley, the battle of Gaines’ Mill, and other stories about the civilian experience when the war came to the homefront.
Length: 1.5 hrs.

Behind Enemy Lines: Rose Greenhow and Elizabeth Van Lew
In the nineteenth century, there were definitive roles for women. However, when the Civil War began, notions of what was and wasn’t proper for women went by the wayside out of necessity. Women were expected to help with the war effort in any way they could. During the Civil War, espionage knew no gender. Both men and women became spies during the war, but it is the women who stand out, simply because it was not expected of women to be so brave and daring.  Through this talk and the PowerPoint, you will learn about two of the most famous spies of the Civil War -Rose Greenhow and Elizabeth Van Lew.
Length: 1.5 hrs.

Bread or Blood: The Richmond Bread Riots of 1863
Desperate times call for desperate measures. Living in the path of the armies, destruction of and loss of property, loss of slave labor, rampant inflation, and shortages made life on the home front a struggle for survival. Civilians were desperate, especially working class women. The winter and early spring of 1863 were certainly desperate times for many. Through this talk and PowerPoint, you will learn about the Richmond Bread Riots, as well as other dire times on the homefront in 1863.
Length: 1.5 hrs.

The Struggle for Survival: Richmond 1863 
Through PowerPoint, participants will “tour” 1863 Richmond and learn about events such as the Confederate States Laboratory explosion on Brown’s Island, Richmond Bread Riots, and Stonewall Jackson’s death. Participants will learn these and many more stories of death, riots, and inflation in the capital of the Confederacy and why 1863 was a true struggle for survival.
Length: 1.5 hrs.

The Struggle for Survival: Richmond 1863 (Walking Tour)
Step back in time on this walking tour of downtown Richmond and discover a city immersed in a desperate battle for survival. Attendees will learn about events such as the Confederate States Laboratory explosion on Brown’s Island, Richmond Bread Riots, and Stonewall Jackson’s death. Participants will learn these and many more stories of death, riots, and inflation in the capital of the Confederacy and why 1863 was a true struggle for survival.
Length: 2 hrs.