Archives Research

The Museum has undertaken a comprehensive cataloging and digitization project of the archives collection.  Onsite research appointments, photocopies, and digital images of archives items will be available only on a sporadic and limited basis until the project is complete.  Due to the staff required for the digitization project, there may be major delays in answering research requests.

We apologize for any inconvenience.  If you have questions, please contact the Director of the Collections Department at rhancock@moc.org.

Access to the Museum Archives for research purposes is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

There is a fee for research appointments; free appointments are a benefit of Museum Membership.

Email us to set an appointment

Books and manuscripts within the Archives' collection do not circulate. Photocopying service is available at a minimal cost. Click here for information on the Museum research services.  Additional information and resources from the library are available in the Members Only section.

Document of the Month

Each month, one item from the Archives will be highlighted. See this month's document here.

Who Was Eleanor S. Brockenbrough? (1910-1985)

Hired as assistant house regent when India Thomas was appointed house regent in 1939, Eleanor Brockenbrough was groomed for a position she was never to assume. In 1963, Brockenbrough took the position of librarian and later assistant director. She served as interim executive director three times. The Museum’s Archives dedicated in 1981 is named after her in honor of her contributions.

The Archives maintain more than 15,000 books and pamphlets, 1,000 prints and sketches, and more than 200 shelf feet of manuscripts. An impressive collection in its own right, our Archives hold such items as the Provisional Confederate Constitution, a draft of Lee’s resignation letter from the U.S. Army, a blood-stained letter written by a mortally wounded soldier to his father, the Southern Women’s History Collection, rare 1860s school books, and one of the world’s largest collections of Jefferson Davis papers. The Confederate currency and bond collection is recognized as second to only the Smithsonian collection.